Wednesday, December 19, 2007

The True Meaning of Christmas

"Love the gift-giver, and not the gift."

- Anonymous

Friday, December 14, 2007

The Light of Home Is Heaven (and Vice Versa)

Heaven and Home are the same thing in many ways.

When I was growing up on Erie Street in Rochester, I was gifted with a beautiful family. My Mom and Dad each had several sisters and brothers that trinkled into our family and created hundreds of cousins and relatives. As such, every night was a party, everyday was a coffee break, and every moment was embraceful joy.

But a yearning for "something else" started to draw me away from this wonderful life with which I was blessed. I wanted to go to Hollywood and become a "star".

So, little by little, I started to draw my plan. Over the years, I moved back and forth from Rochester to Los Angeles. I lived here a little bit. I lived there a little bit. And then it seemed, like all of a sudden, the family that I had known and loved my entire life was gone.

Many aunts and uncles passed away. My cousins who were my best friends moved away. Seemingly, everyone had abandoned me. Yet, I had first abandoned them - for Hollywood.

I left the warmth and love of my family for the counterfit love of Hollywood and potential stardom - a life that I thought would have offered more than what I had already.

And that's exactly what happened when we left Heaven for life on Earth. Everything was fine in Heaven. We existed as pure Orb Beings of Light.

Then, through the gift of free will, granted to us by God=Love, we desired that "something else"...we yearned for a different kind of life - a "better" life - and we thought we would find it on Earth. Just like I thought I would have found more satisfaction in Hollywood than in Rochester.

As you may have heard me say before, I have learned that it is more important to live the scripts of life, then to write them. And I reach to meet that challenge every day...to embrace the simple treasured life of what I learned and experienced on Erie Street.

As to how to prepare and make way for your journey to Heaven while you're still on Earth?

Here's some advice:

Bless those who curse you, forgive those who hurt you and Love those who hate you. Because you only take with you to Heaven every gentle act and intention of Love and Loving-Kindness. Everything else that is not love, melts away in the glow of God's unconditional Love.

So, essentially, in order for your Light to shine in your true Spiritual Home in Heaven, it first must shine from your Physical Home here on Earth.

Happy Holidays!

Tuesday, December 11, 2007

My Top Ten Christmas Carols (Songs) Of All Time

1] CHRISTMASTIME IS HERE (Written by Vince Guaraldi - from A Charlie Brown Christmas)

Show me a better song representative of Christmas? Okay, maybe The Christmas Song by Nat King Cole - but nothing revs up the Holiday heart strings like this classic tune sung by the Peanuts gang on one of the best Christmas TV specials of all time (see previous post - and see video link below).


2] THERE'S ALWAYS TOMORROW (FOR DREAMS TO COME TRUE) By Janet Orenstein from Rudolph, The Red-Nosed Reindeer TV special.

Like Christmastime is Here from A Charlie Brown Christmas, this true-love bearing (and en-deer-ing) song from TV's other classic perennial, Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer, hits all the right chords. Years after first hearing it as a kid, my college crush Debbie Bell (yep, that was her name) sang this for me on her piano. And I couldn't believe she had the sheet music.


3] SILVER & GOLD (performed by Burl Ives on Rudolph).

Stripping away the materialism of what it may appear to mean (silver and gold money, for example), this song caters to core of Christmas - and teaches us to decorate our trees with only the sincerest of colors (that you just know somehow glisten on and make into Heaven - which, of course, is already paved with silver and gold).


4] HOLLY-JOLLY CHRISTMAS (performed by Burl Ives on Rudolph).

Put away your frown, Mr. Scrooge...I dare you not to dance when you hear this jingle bell.


5] LAST CHRISTMAS by George Michael.

George has certainly had his share of issues in the years since his early days with WHAM, but this song wasn't one of 'em. Instead, it goes down in history as one of the most beautiful and somber pop-rock carols of all time.


6] ALL I WANT FOR CHRISTMAS IS YOU by Mariah Carey.

Like George Michael before her, Mariah Carey has experienced a few personal challenges in recent years. However, her talent is astounding - and her voice is pure - as is so pristinely evident heart-felt holiday rockin' tune.


7] FELICE NAVIDA by Jose Feliciano.

Before it became hip for non-Latinos to speak Spanish in the US, the gifted Jose Ferrer introduced mainstream Americana to the international sounds of Christmas with this bangin' gee-tar-driven holiday present that broke the language barrier.


8] SO THIS IS CHRISTMAS (offcially titled Happy Christmas) by John Lennon.

One would expect nothing less from the man who brought us the timeless beauty of Imagine.


9] LITTLE SAINT NICK by Brian Wilson (and Mike Love).

The genius of The Beach Boys' Brian Wilson is front and center for Christmas. And is it really any wonder that this tune appears on TBB's first Christmas album, which just so happened to be released in the same year (1964) that Rudolph debuted on TV? 'Course not. The angels know what they're doing.


10] DO THEY KNOW IT'S CHRISTMAS?

Before being charitable in the public eye became cool, this haunting tune was recorded to help feed the hungry - not only of the body - but of the heart and the soul. In the process, it reminds us exactly what Christmas is supposed to be all about (clue: not buying Christmas gifts at the mall, which opens at 4 AM on Black Friday).


I now leave you with a holiday invitation to listen to and look at a very special Christmastime - by clicking on the link below.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aQjUWyGc8Nk

Sunday, December 09, 2007

Oprah Winfrey Presents: Mitch Albom's FOR ONE MORE DAY On ABC

"If only I had one more day to...."

"...Tell her I loved her?"

"...Tell her how much I cared...?

"...Not to sit it out but dance...?"

Well, here's another chance reminder to not only go for the gusto, but to love and forgive everyone who has ever hurt you - to commit acts that will not only help to ease your days here on Earth - but to more clearly pave your path to Heaven.

As such, for your viewing pleasure tonight (and maybe your trip to the Light Fantastic through eternity), I highly recommend tonight's broadcast on ABC of Oprah Winfrey Presents: Mitch Albom's For One More Day. Come on, let it go - and let your Light shine...and let it commence from the glowing reflection from your TV screen via this astounding TV-movie, the details for which now follow:

Emmy Award-winning actor Michael Imperioli (The Sopranos) and Academy Award-winning actress Ellen Burstyn (The Fountain, The Exorcist) star in this two-hour TV-movie event, entitled, Oprah Winfrey Presents: Mitch Albom's For One More Day, premiering tonight (Sunday, December 9th on ABC from 9:00 to 11 PM.

The production, which wrapped this week, was shot primarily on location in Connecticut.

In the film, based on Albom's bestselling book For One More Day, Imperioli plays Chick Benetto, a broken-down former baseball player who has collapsed into alcoholism and despair. He returns one night to his small hometown with plans to take his life. At the final moment, he is magically granted one more day with his departed mother, Posey Benetto, played by Burstyn, who illuminates the secrets of both their lives and shows him a way to redemption.

Samantha Mathis (The Punisher, American Psycho) and Scott Cohen (Law & Order: Trial by Jury, upcoming show The Return of Jezebel James) also star. Michael Imperioli's son, Vadim Imperioli, plays the role of the younger Chick in his acting film debut.

Harpo Films produced the film under its Oprah Winfrey Presents banner for ABC. Oprah Winfrey and Kate Forte are the executive producers. Lloyd Kramer (Mitch Albom's The Five People You Meet in Heaven) directed the film, with the teleplay written by Mitch Albom. The previous collaboration by Oprah Winfrey, Kate Forte and Mitch Albom, Tuesdays with Morrie, yielded four Emmy wins, including for Outstanding Made-for-Television Movie and Outstanding Lead Actor in a Mini-Series or Movie.

Saturday, December 08, 2007

My Top 10 ANIMATED Christmas Specials

A few days ago, I listed my Top 10 Favorite Christmas TV-Movies. Now, it's time to do the same with animated Christmas specials. And away we go...


1] A Charlie Brown Christmas (CBS, 1965). Directed by Bill Melendez. Written by Charles Schulz.

Young voice-over talent Peter Robbins made his indelible mark as Charlie Brown in this poignant holiday classic that spawned a series of similar specials for every holiday. Here, Charlie Brown searches for the true meaning of Christmas and the perfect tree. While directing a school play, he ultimately finds both, though not before our young low-acheiver is confronted by a number of obstacles. None the least of these conflicts is presented by his own dog Snoopy's obsession with winning first prize for a local decorations competition, or by his mean-spirited peers who mock his choice of a tiny sickly tree. Through it all, Charlie continues to struggle for peace of mind in his December time, when he is forced to visit with his pseudo-psycholgoist friend (and foe) Lucy, who offers him a 5 cents therapy session. Following a desperate plea (during which he screams, "Can't anyone tell me what Christmas is all about?!"), CB finally hears the real deal - from Lucy's young brother Linus, of all people. "I can tell you," Linus reveals. And in one of the most uniquely animated moments in the history of the genre, Linus goes on to quote the Biblical story of the first Christmas. In a matter of moments, CB's misguided pals realize their inconsideration and, with the help and reconfiguration of Snoopy's prize-winning decorations, breathe life into a once-listless tree - further uncovering and "illuminating" the true meaning of Christmas. "Hark the herald" these young animated angels then all sing.


2] Rudolph, The Red-Nosed Reindeer (CBS, 1964): Directed by Kizo Nagashima and Larry Roemer. Written by Robert May and Romeo Miller.

A "true love" story. Lessons about maturity, responsibility, pride, prejduice, ambition and acceptance; deciphering "deer pressure" from "elf-improvement." Dispelling the fear surrounding a visit to the dentist? Learning that no toy is happy unless it is truly loved by a child? Some of the most beautiful Christmas songs ever written (There's Always Tomorrow; Silver and Gold). What else could anyone want in a Christmas TV special? This classic always signals the commencement of the holiday season - and reminds me so much to slow my pace and shine on until the morning - and beyond. Featuring the awesome talents of Burl Ives, who we first meet in the North Pole midst of a field of Christmas trees ("Yep - this is where we grow 'em?).


3] Santa Claus Is Comin' To Town (ABC, 1969): Directed by Jules Bass and Arthur Rankin, Jr. Written by Romeo Miller.

Taking it's cue from Rudolph, this smart Christmas tale expands on the popularity of a Christmas song and threads a charming tale about the origins of St. Nick - here voiced by Mickey Rooney. Also along for the ride: Fred Astaire (serving the narrator purpose, alla Burl Ives on Rudolph) as the Christmas Mailman. Also featuring the vocal talents of Keenan Wynn, Paul Frees, Joan Gardner and Robie Lester.


4] The Year Without A Santa Claus (ABC, 1974): Directed by Jules Bass and Arthur Rankin, Jr. Written by William Keenan and based on the novel by Phyllis McGinley.

Mickey Rooney returns as Santa, this time joined by Shirley Hazel Booth as Mrs. Claus in smart take that may be sub-coded, Santa Takes A Holiday - as the jolly one gets sick and decides to take a break from Christmas. As such, a quite sophisticated animated tale is delivered, along with an astounding message and pristine dialogue. In fact, this cartoon was so impressive, it spawned a life-action TV-movie (starring John Goodman) in 2006.


5] A Christmas Carol (Syndicated, 1970). Directed by Zoran Janjic. Written by Michael Robinson and based on the classic novel by Charles Dickens.

Who says television isn't educational? This was my introduction to the great mind of Charles Dickens. Up until then, I thought cartoons only meant Scooby Doo, Where Are You? - not to mention, great literature. Starring the voiceover talents of Alistair Duncan, Ron Haddick (as Scrooge), John Llewellyn, Bruce Montague, Brenda Senders and many others.


6] The Night The Animals Talked (CBS, 1970): Directed by Shamus Culhane. Written by Peter Fernandez, Jan Hartman and others.

Just about his far away from Dr. Doolittle as you can get, we learn here what the animals were thinking at the birth of Christ. They are granted the gift of gab - and we are granted the gift of insight. Mind-boggling - and aeons ahead of its time. Starring the vocal gymnastics of Pat Bright, Ruth Franklin, Bob Kaliban, Len Maxwell, Joe Silver, Frank Porella and others.


7] 'Twas The Night Before Christmas (CBS, 1974): Directed by Jules Bass and Arthur Rankin, Jr. Written by Jerome Coopersmith and based on the poem by Clement Moore.

Producers/directors Bass and Rankin steered away from stop-action animation (Rudolph, Santa Claus Is Comin' To Town) and headed into the then-more traditional animatrics of the era. What's more, it's also told in a 30-minute format (as opposed to the aforementioned 60-minutes, though first completed a few years before with Frosty the Snowman in 1969). But their style is still evident especially drawn in the eyes and "heart" of each character. A sweet narrative delivery of a perfect holiday ryhme. Feauturing the voices of Patricia Bright, Scott Firestone, George Gobel (Hollywood Squares), Broadway giant and film legend Joel Grey, and Tammy Grimes (the original choice for Samantha on TV's Bewitched; but she said no),


8] The Little Drummer Boy (NBC, 1968): Directed by Jules Bass, Arthur Rankin, Jr. and others. Written by Romeo Muller.

Two years after CBS got heavy with A Charlie Brown Christmas, the Peacock network delivered this equally-deep and spiritual take on an animated Christmas TV special. Based on the classic song (that was later historically duetted by Bing Crosby and David Bowie on one of BC's traditional NBC Holiday specials). Starring the vocal prowess of Jose Ferrer, Paul Frees, June Foray, and narrated by Greer Garson.


9] How The Grinch Stole Christmas (CBS, 1966): Directed by Chuck Jones and Ben Washam. Written by Bob Ogle and based on the book by Dr. Seuss.

Director Ron Howard and actor Jim Carrey made a valiant attempt to bring Whoville to the live big-screen a few years back, but ain't nothing like the original unreal thing - especially due to the vocal brilliance of Boris Karloff.


10] Frosty The Snowman (CBS, 1969): Directed by Jules Bass and Arthur Rankin. Written by Romeo Miller.

Here, Jimmy Durrante (like his compadres Burl Ives and Fred Astaire before) serves as narrator to yet another Christmas carol come to life - along with Frosty. A sequel (Frosty Returns) later followed (with John Goodman, years before he donned the live action edition of The Year Without A Santa Claus - stepped in for Jackie Vernon). But it wasn't the same. Also starring the voices of the great Billie De Wolfe (The Doris Day Show), and Bass/Rankin/Miller stalwharts Paul Frees and June Foray.

Tuesday, December 04, 2007

My Top Ten Christmas TV-Movies Of All Time

Wow - Christmas TV-movies are popping up like hotcakes. The Hallmark Channel and Lifetime keep making new ones every year, there's always at least one on CBS (via the Hallmark Hall of Fame productions), and ABC Family and the i network (formerly PAX TV) have their share of Santa-plus stories as well.

Either way, it's definately time to take a look at the best of the crop (in my humble opinion - okay, how 'bout just opinion) that have been aired over the years - and hopefully, you'll agree (I just LOVE yes people). But please, too, feel free to comment and add your own choices to the list.

So, here we go:


1] THE HOUSE WITHOUT A CHRISTMAS TREE (CBS, 1972): Directed by Paul Bogart. Written by Eleanor Perry and Gail Rock. Based on the book by Rock.

Jamie Mills (played by the great Jason Robards) has grown bitter over the years after losing his wife a decade before. As such, he no longer celebrates Christmas and refuse to put a tree. But this is no run-of-the-mill take on Scrooge - especially after watching Jaime's young daughter Addie (Lisa Lucas) ultimately drag a decorated tree through town and into the Mills living room. If you're looking for your heart, you'll find it in this movie. Mildred Natwick offerred her usual perfect performance, here - in a supporting role - as Robards' mother. Special note: This flick's budget was low, forcing it to be videotaped (like everything pretty much today - though some TV shows and movies make it look like film). But somehow it adds to the "reality".


2] MIRACLE ON 34TH STREET (CBS, 1973): Directed by Fielder Cook. Written by Valentine Davies, Jeb Rosebrook (and others).

No, it ain't the original 1947 feature film classic (with a tiny Natalie Wood), but it sure as heck ain't the overblown remake from 1994. Nope, this little puppy of a version starred the late Sebastian Cabot (Mr. French from TV's Family Affair), David Hartman (soon to be an early rising staple on ABC's Good Morning, America) and Jane Alexander (who was just about to find super fame playing Eleanor Rosevelt in a series of TV-movies for ABC). Look also for this astounding supporting cast: Roddy McDowall, Jim Backus (Gilligan's Isalnd, Mr. Magoo), James Gregory (Barny Miller), Conrad Janis (Mork & Mindy), Roland Winters, and David Doyle (Charlie's Angels) and Tom Bosley (Happy Days) - the latter two of whom have been cross-identified by viewers for years - and who appeared here on screen together for the first time. you can't beat that - and you can't beat this TV-flick for slick production values (for its time), nostalgia (on so many fronts) and a straight-forward "logic within the illogic" script. Awesome. Just awesome. Everything a Christmas TV-movie (or any TV-movie for that matter) should be.


3] FATHER KNOWS BEST: HOME FOR CHRISTMAS (NBC, 1977): Directed by Norman Abbott and based on the original TV series created by Ed James.

Like The House Without A Christmas Tree, this TV-flick was produced with an extremely low budget (it wasn't even filmed like the original series, but videotaped - like a daytime soap opera). But little matter. The script is in place, story is home-made-for-TV, and the cast is dynamite, including all original members of the original Father series, such as: Robert Young (Marcus Welby, MD), Jane Wyatt (Spock's mom on Star Trek), Lauren Chapin, Elinor Donahue (who later married the much-older executive producer Harry Bewitched Ackerman), Christopher Gardner, and Billy Gray. When Young as Jim Anderson puts up those Christmas lights outside the house, I can't help but be reminded of my super Uncle Carl - who did the same for so many years on Erie Street. This movie will remind you of similar memories I'm sure.


4] SAINT MAYBE (1998, CBS): Directed by Michael Pressman. Written by Robert W. Lenski. Based on the book by Anne Tyler.

Not a Christmas movie, per se, but filled with the astounding spirit of one. Thomas McCarthy plays a lonely teen who works past a tragic car accident that kills his sister, and forces him to care for her three children. Moving, pristine and downright awe-inspiring. Also starring Blythe Danner, Edward Hermann (who played alongside the aforementioned Jane Alexander in those Rosevelt TV-movies), the beautiful Melina Kanakaraedes, Mary-Louise Parker (Weeds), and former TV-movie queen, Glynnis O'Connor.


5] CHRISTMAS ON DIVISION STREET (1991, ABC). Directed by George Kaczender. Written by Barry Morrow.

As usual, Fred Savage (The Wonder Years) delivers another fine performance, this time as the privledged offspring of wealthy parents who learn the true meaning of Christmas from their son (who learns it from a homeless man). Hint: it doesn't have anything to do with buying lots of expensive, materialistic gifts for people. Also starring Hume Cronyn, Badja Djola, Cloyce Morrow, Kenneth Walsh and Kahla Lichti.


6] A DAD FOR CHRISTMAS (a.k.a. Me and Luke, 2006, CBS). Directed by Eleanor Lindo. Written by Alan Hines. Based on the novel (Me and Luke) by Audrey O'Hearn.

As with Saint Maybe, this pristine small screen film is not clearly defined as a Christmas TV-movie (though there's a Christmas dinner in there at the end). But it's infested with the spirit. Newcomer Kristopher Turner plays a compassionate teen father who sets out to protec and claim his newborn son from the likes of the child's selfish mother. The Oscar-winning Louise Fletcher, as the Turner's grandmother, steps up to the plate as the first-time Dad's main ally.
Also starring Philip Akin, Lindsay Ames, and others.


7] BORROWED HEARTS: A HOLIDAY ROMANCE (1997, CBS): Directed by Ted Kotcheff. Written by Pamel Wallace and Earl W. Wallace.

Roma Downey is no angel. But Hector Elizondo is in this flick, which also stars Eric McCormack in a pre-Will & Grace straight role. Bottom line: She's poor. He's her rich, snobby corporate boss - and they're both brought together by her daughter Carly (Janet Baily) - with a little help from an Elizondo.


8] IT HAPPENED ONE CHRISTMAS (1977, ABC): Directed by Donald Wrye. Written by Jo Swerling and Frank Capra.

Before the rest of the universe realized how wonderful It's A Wonderful Life is, That Girl star Marlo Thomas reworked the 1947 Jimmy Stewart classic with a female twist. And the results were impressive. It's probably BECAUSE of this small-screener that people began to become obsessed with the original. Also starring the iconic Orson Welles (as Mr. Potter), Wayne Rogers (M*A*S*H), Cloris Leachman (The Mary Tyler Moore Show), Dick O'Neil, Cliff Norton, Christoper Guest, C. Thomas Howell and Doris Roberts (Everybody Loves Raymond) and Ma Baily.


9] A CHRISTMAS CAROL (1984, CBS). Directed by Clive Donner. Written by Roger O. Hirsen - and Charles Dickens

Though the Charles Dickens classic has been remade about a gazillion times, this version starring George C. Scott takes the cake - and the entire dessert table. A top-level, A-List production from every angle. Also starring: Frank Finlay, Angela Pleasence, Edward Woodward, David Warner, Susannah York, Roger Rees, and so many other fine actors.


10] THE NIGHT THEY SAVED CHRISTMAS (CBS, 1984): Directed by Jackie Cooper. Written by Jim Maloney.

A lot better than you would think - with the additional benefits of Charlie's Angels beauty Jaclyn Smith, the legendary Art Carney (The Honeymooners), Paul Le Mat (who starred opposite Smith's Angels co-star Farrah Fawcett in 1985's The Burning Bed), June Lockhart (Lost in Space), Paul Williams, Scott Grimes and many others.

Sunday, December 02, 2007

Peace on Earth.

Please.